VT Diner Tour: Miss Bellows Falls

IMG_1421Miss Bellows Falls Diner, Bellows Falls, VT

The Miss Bellows Falls Diner is easy to find on Rockingham Street, off Route 5, in Bellows Falls. It is a Worcester Lunch Car Company diner built in 1944 as #771. It is basically free-standing, with vestibules added on either end, workspace and restrooms along the back, and shingles on the curved roof. Angle parking is in a lot beside it and also across the street.

The outside is enameled metal displaying the name in large red letters on a light gray background, and inside the walls and counter are also faced with enameled metal, the first time we’ve seen that in a Worcester. It was also the first Worcester we’ve seen with panes of stained glass decorating each window.

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The interior is not as well preserved as some we’ve visited. Only nine seats remain at the counter, with gaps where stools are missing. The original bank of coolers is still in use and all meal cooking appears to be done behind the counter. Five oak booths line the outer wall, and the line of windows is dressed up with red and white half-curtains. No chrome makes this place shine, but it appeared to be clean. For more photos, go here.

The service definitely did not shine. While we had previously experienced diner waitresses with dynamic personalities who enjoyed interacting with customers, we now had a basically disinterested young waitress who forgot we were there, even though the entire tiny diner had five customers, including us. After dropping off two cans of Barq’s root beer (no glasses, no ice offered), she proceeded to lean on the counter with her back to us, talking to the young male cook while we watched and waited. Even though he was facing us, he didn’t seem to notice we were more than ready to order. It was obvious the owner was not on-site, and neither employee was invested in the long-term success of the business.

Once the waitress finally remembered us and took our order, we waited a reasonable amount of time for the food, but it was not quick. When delivering the food, she also dropped off the bill, and told us to pay when we were ready. The fact that we might want dessert apparently did not occur to her. This became even more evident when we sat with empty plates and waited for her to notice. By then, more customers had come in, and a full fifteen minutes passed without her even glancing our way. (Bad planning on someone’s part to have a clock on the wall, facing ignored customers.)

The epitome of dearth-of-service came when she finally noticed that we weren’t offering to pay and came our way with a frown on her face. Four types of pie were written on a white board as being available for dessert; Don ordered banana cream. She snatched up the bill and walked away. She never asked if he’d like coffee with his pie. After several minutes, she sauntered back to say there was no banana cream pie and, by the way, no chocolate cream pie, either, just apple and coconut cream. Now, one might hope that a waitress in a tiny restaurant with a minimal menu, would know ahead of time that two of four pies did not actually exist. One might hope she would even erase them from the white board. One might hope.

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Perhaps the empty pie cooler should have been a hint.

BLT: My BLT provided some firsts for me. Number one, the mayo was delivered on the side, albeit in a generous portion. I’ve never been served a do-it-yourself BLT before, but I deconstructed my BLT and slathered a goodly amount of mayonnaise onto the very dry toast triangles. Even so, the sandwich continued to taste dry, and I realized it was because the tomato was paper-thin, on the verge of transparency. I have never seen a tomato sliced that thin before. I actually did not realize it was possible to slice a tomato that thin, and I wish I had witnessed the slicing. It was either done with great skill on a very sharp mandoline or else with a laser beam. I should have thought to record it for posterity with my camera, but I guess I was too enthralled by the superhuman accomplishment to take a photo.

The sandwich was supposed to come with chips and a pickle, so when no pickle was to be found, I waved down the recalcitrant waitress and notified her of the missing item. She delivered two long dill pickle wedges to our table, since Don’s pickle was missing, as well.

On a scale of 1 to 10, with 5 being average, I gave my BLT a (2).

Hamburger: Don’s hamburger came with lettuce and mayo on the side and, eventually, the elusive pickle; tomato was available for a 50 cent additional charge (I have to admit, I would have loved to see the thickness of the 50 cent tomato). No onion was offered. He opted for the French fries and cole slaw that came with the hamburger “plate” for an additional $1.99. The burger came on a store-bought hamburger bun; the meat was thick and cooked as requested (medium-well). He gave the burger a (7).

French fries: The fries appeared to be handcut and were golden brown. (8)

Dessert: Non-existent. (0)

Prices:
BLT: $5.95, included ripple chips and a pickle wedge that required a vocalized request to materialize
Burger: $4.00, lettuce and mayo; no tomato, no onion; chips and the elusive pickle
Fries and cole slaw: $1.99 additional; replaced the chips
Root beers: $1.00 each; served in the can with a straw; no glass, no ice, obviously no refill

Total bill before taxes and gratuity: $13.94

Service: Minimal and grudgingly provided. (2)

Restrooms: Single-person, small, gender-specific; somewhat shabby but clean. (9)

Overall experience: 4.5  (out of 10)

Contact Information
Miss Bellow Falls Diner
90 Rockingham Street
Bellows Falls, VT 05101
(802) 463-3700

Serving breakfast and lunch only. Closes at 2 p.m. daily. Accepts credit cards as long as your bill is at least $5.00 before gratuity.

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